Kids with disabilities – Micro Scooters: Review

Kids with disabilities – Micro Scooters: Review

BB is finally starting to catch up, her walking has slowly turned to a stumbling run, her jumping is reaching the dizzy heights of three millimetres and the memory of spica is slowly starting to fade.

My nerves are not so quick to dissipate, I see a slide and I shudder with the dread of a broken leg and when she tries to climb my heart leaps into my mouth and camps out for a while.

She craves normality, friends her age zoom past on bikes and scooters and physically she has not been strong enough to join in the games. She claps with delight as children fly past using feet to propel wheels and it is then I see longing in her eyes.

Micro Scooters contacted us to see if BB would like to review one of their scooters, instantly the three-wheeled version appealed to my sense of safety but in addition the mini scooter came with a seat which would allow BB a greater chance of being able to play like the other kids with her weaker limbs.

The scooter arrived on the night twin girl was admitted to hospital and sat unnoticed in its box for a week whilst we struggled back to normality.  I called BB over as I finally unwrapped the packaging and my heart broke a little when she realised what the box contained and suddenly she sprung onto me embracing me in a hug that almost knocked me over.

“My scooter mummy, for me, for me.” she cried with sheer elation and I realised even more how much she wanted to be like every one else.

Her delight so far has involved sitting on the scooter but she quickly discarded the seat and is using the scooter around the house to strengthen her leg and to remove paint from the walls….. We are both nervous about taking it outside until turning and cornering has been mastered.  Already I can see a marked improvement in her mobility but the real change has been her confidence, normally wary to try something new with her legs she leaps on the scooter with an eagerness that threatens to spill over.  She has yet to master speed but we are all happy watching her learn.

Micro Scooter

For any parent of a child with a disability, especially DDH I would highly recommend they give a Micro Scooter a whirl to make moving fun again.  BB wouldn’t sit still long enough for me to snap a shot of how the seat works but you can check out the ToyTalk Awards site where Micro Scooters won the 2012 Award for the best ride on to see a video of how it works.

*disclaimer – we were sent a mini micro scooter to review – all opinions are my own.

 

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12 Comments

  1. November 28, 2012 / 5:40 pm

    You’ve reminded me to remove the seat from F’s scooter. It’s gathering dust at the moment because she doesn’t understand how to use it. Maybe we’ll get on better without the seat!

    • northernmum
      Author
      December 5, 2012 / 9:48 pm

      Libs did so much better without the seat x

  2. November 28, 2012 / 10:39 pm

    Great to see that companies are interested in getting views on how their products suit disabled children…..

    • northernmum
      Author
      December 5, 2012 / 9:48 pm

      Micro Scooters do some great work x

  3. November 29, 2012 / 1:39 am

    Made my heart melt that BB is so happy with the scooter.

    • northernmum
      Author
      December 5, 2012 / 9:49 pm

      she loves it x

  4. November 29, 2012 / 9:43 am

    This post really made me smile. Looks like she is really enjoying her scooter and I’m sure she’ll be flying passed everyone in no time.

    • northernmum
      Author
      December 5, 2012 / 9:49 pm

      Thanks Laura x

  5. December 2, 2012 / 9:53 pm

    I cannot praise Micro Scooters highly enough. they are the best. proper brilliant and all that.

    • northernmum
      Author
      December 5, 2012 / 9:49 pm

      ta gem

  6. Pingback: Micro-Scooter
  7. September 28, 2013 / 2:38 pm

    I am an adult with disabilities having MS and using a micro scooter has enabled me (albeit with some risk since I can’t hop off ) to get around much better with my family in parks. Shopping centres etc. I have been challenged with policies of not allowing such things but explain it like blind folks being allowed dogs where dogs generally are not allowed.

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